Some couples have no problems sleeping in the same room, but not every couple is the same. When it comes to having a partner who snores, tosses and turns in the middle of the night, needs a different firmness to the mattress, or a different temperature to sleep, it may be time to think about sleeping in separate beds, if not in separate rooms.

“It used to be the norm for couples to have separate bedrooms, but over time the idea you had to sleep next to your spouse or else were in a loveless relationship took hold” (Parnell). It is this very idea that has led some couples to have relationship issues. It’s normal to not want to sleep with someone with night sweats or who snores loud enough to rattle the windows. It’s not only normal but can be beneficial as well. When couples both have a restful night of sleep, the next day is that much better for it.

The demand is on the rise, too. “It’s on the increase — one in four couples sleeps apart, according to research by the US National Sleep Foundation, and in America, real estate agents have reported an upsurge in demand for homes with two master bedrooms” (Parnell). Having a separate room may not be for everyone, but neither is everyone sharing a room the solution either. The best advice is to do what’s best for the relationship and reap the benefits of a great night’s sleep.

-Quit Counting Sheep…Sleep with a Wolf!

Sources:

Parnell, Kerry. “Couples who sleep apart stay together.” The Daily Telegraph, https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/couples-who-sleep-apart-stay-together/news-story/49f133134e6329a10129456ea9ce7cf5. Accessed 27 July 2018.